newengland

Farmertan presents the electric "Muse of Fire, Act 1"

Welcome to Muse of Fire, Act 1, the first installment of Connecticut group Farmertan’s latest album. This first entry is charged-up and bursting at its seams with gritty tunes, dirty, so easy to enjoy. “Automation” contrasts crisp-clean electric guitar riffs ascending against a sonic canvas of energizing distortion. “Mud Season” showcases vocals that have more than a tinge of spice, a type of been-there-done-that attitude that fits with the fortitude of the music. The drums on the track erupt, lead, and accompany the song’s guitar solo to its summit. “Sleepwalker” keeps the intensity going and leans a bit indie with its reverb-heavy chorus lines and rich bass subtleties. This is a modern rock ‘n’ roll record at its purest, introduced by a group of gents always prepared for the long haul. Stream “Mud Season” below and stay tuned for the next act from these CT artists. - Rene Cobar

   

Paul Michael reveals the escape door in new record "Pain & Love"

Connecticut never stops surprising with its immense pool of talent, musicians of all genres, ever-growing. Paul Michael is swimming in that pool, and boy does he set himself apart with a delicious brand of EDM that is mint-modern and scented with touches of the French invasion of DJs that included David Guetta and Bob Sinclar. In his record Pain & Love, Michael showcases tracks like “Real Fantasy,” which are sensuous, silky, and powered by heartbeat-like rhythms to close your eyes to and surrender. Tributes are alive and well in songs like “Keep” whose synths peacock the pseudo-futurism of the ‘80s. “Some Things You Cannot Hide” has hints of pop, sticky-good, and very 2020. The record is an escape route that beckons; stream “Let Go of Me” below for a taste of something uplifting. - Rene Cobar

   

Pattern Addict defines high and lows in new single "One Eye Open"

Anxiety is normal during uncertain times, but the remembrance of one’s blessings like family, a home, and humanity united should always triumph over fear. As we sit and reflect, thoughts may feel like thunder rumbling in a storm of maddening, pouring news; on the other side of the tempest is a better tomorrow still and good music to enjoy. Searching the endless talent pool of New England, we stumbled upon an October single that feels like it fits the mood. Pattern Addict, from Vermont, embraces the highs and lows of life, and well highlights them, in its single “One Eye Open” which alternates from serene verses to furious choruses comprised of tough acoustic guitar riffs, swift keys, sharp drum snaps, and a sweet arpeggiating bass. The song’s final minute is an instrumental treat that is both bluesy and indie, perfect for a much-needed escape. Not much more to say these days: stream the single below and hang in there, folks. - Rene Cobar

   

Yavin showcases modern grit in new single "Bitter"

Strange times, folks. For those of us who are finding time at home a bit of a blur, there is always music to liven things up. Boston’s Yavin provides a refreshing hit of electro-pop to romp in earnest. “Bitter” has all the sheen of sweet modernism: richly-layered hooks, a thumping bassline, and a much-desired summer evening vibe that feels so not far away. The young artist’s entire aesthetic is fit for the chaos and beauty of these present-day junctures; one can expect Yavin to become a talking point of the year, his single is just an intoxicatingly melancholic announcement too upbeat not to let loose to. Stream Yavin’s latest single below and stay healthy, New England. - Rene Cobar, photo by Eric Magnussen

   

Chance Emerson is ever the storyteller in new record "The Raspberry Men"

The man, the traveler, the folk singer-songwriter you got to check out is Chance Emerson. Shifting his time from Concord, NH to Hong Kong to Providence, RI, and beyond this artist has crafted a sonic journal of his travels titled The Raspberry Men, and wow does it tell a story. The new record has a worldly feel from the start as “How Can I” showcases toxic rhythms often found in Africa and some parts of Latin America; Emerson’s rich choruses are grandiose and provocative. Songs like “Annabelle” are rooted in modern melancholy: the feeling of missing someone real among the many faces in our various phone apps. “Coming to Japan” is an atmospheric tour of Emerson’s experience abroad as well as a confession, as he says, “No, I’m not from anywhere, I’m a nowhere man at heart.” Each song is a fantastic chapter in the life of an artist that dares to see the world for what it is, and he for what he could be in it. Stream the laid-back and oh-so-honest track “It Won’t Be Pretty” below for the midweek vibe you deserve. - Rene Cobar