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Review: Movers and Shakers - Middle East Downstairs - 3/25

Movers & Shakers, Boston’s prodigies of all good-things Americana, performed a tight nine song set at the Middle East Downstairs on Thursday, March 25th. Movers & Shakers’ music encapsulates some of the best elements of Americana: A fusion of rock, country and blues that form a fluid, sometimes gritty, simultaneously mournful and uplifting sound that hits as comforting and familiar even when it’s brand new. Their vocals are strong, at times melancholy and always imbued with a playful twinge of country twang that lends itself to both rambling rock songs and slower, mournful ballads. The balance of alt-rock lamentations and bluesy warbles blend harmoniously to bind the songs to each other, creating a cohesive overarching feel to the music that allows the group to shift focus to different styles ingrained in their work.

The instrumental work is strong: Rambling country-rock guitar sounds break into darker crescendos as effortlessly as they spin into freestyle breakdowns that showcase elements of bluegrass and jam bands. Drum work is tight, forceful without being overpowering, a solid and deep rhythm while the use of symbols adds a layer of metallic dissonance that comes across as being a necessary punctuation to the music. These musical layers inter-weave to create songs that ring as comforting, enjoyably familiar and accessible without being a rehashing of previous styles.

Movers & Shakers have carved their name through their catchy Americana offerings, energizing songs that draw equally from rock and country, bluegrass and rambling jams that all sounds fresh without sacrificing the portmanteau essence of the genre. Indeed, stepping into their music is a homecoming of sorts, a return to the classics ingrained in our musical consciousness that simultaneously challenges the audience to experience those classics in new ways. Movers & Shakers consistently re-examine the roots of American music to create glittering songs that blend dynamic vocals, talented guitars and solid rhythms to create the unique sense that their music is not something heard but something remembered.

--Meghan Guidry

   

Good-bye and Good luck, Nicole Soriano.

 

I just want to take a moment and thank one of our writers for her time. Nicole Soriano will be moving to the great city of Austin, Texas tomorrow. The great thing about Nicole is that she truly loves the Boston and Cambridge music scenes. She is a devoted fan of many wonderful bands and musicians and got the word out about shows. She attended probably more live shows than you have. It is sadly rare to know a fan who cares so much about music that they spend their days soaked in it and cultivating it. We are losing a trooper, one of our best. Not just on the Deli, but in Cambridge and Boston. We all need to go see live music more often to make up for the lack of her presence.

Come back soon, Nicole. Miss you already. And thank you.

You can take the Nicole out of Camberville, but you can't take the Camberville out of Nicole.

--The Deli Staff

   

Freezepop at Cafe 939 - 3/27 - Special PAX East show!

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Freezepop will be performing a rare all ages show at Café 939 on Boylston Street in Boston this Saturday at 4:00. Even if you don’t immediately recognize the name, if you’ve been around any media in the last decade, chances are you’ve heard Freezepop. This Boston based electro-pop group has featured their music in television series (MTV’s The Hills and PBS’s Arthur, to name a few) and have contributed music to video games such as Rock Band, Guitar Hero and Dance Dance Revolution. The band has slowly been making their mark in the US and Europe through songs like “Frontload,” and “Less Talk More Rokk,” which took the #4 spot in iTunes top dance/electronica songs of 2007. Freezepop made their musical mark by blending pop song structures with electronica to create a sublimely dance-able sound that resonates with hipsters and rock aficionados as much as it does with dance crowd. Vintage DJ/VJ gear, phenomenal stage presence and Freezepop’s infectious electro-pop songs ensure this show is not to be missed.

--Meghan Guidry

   

PPALMM tape release party at Middle East Upstairs on 3/27, with Toro Y Moi, the Ruby Suns and Cate Le Bon

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When Neon Indian bailed on Boston’s Together Fest, PPALMM got bumped onto an already fantastic Great Scott’s bill with the likes of Das Racist and locals Southern Belle, Mystery Roar, and DJ Die Young. PPALMM, aka Paul J. Morse, serves up danceable, droney Blade Runner beats in sets that are each, “…meant to be presented as new aural textures, distinctly different from the last,” according to their myspace page. His latest release Cal-Aesthetics will be debuted (on tape) alongside a stellar lineup including Cate Le Bon, the Ruby Suns and your favorite R&B/disco chillwaver Toro Y Moi. Find out what’s new with PPALMM at the Middle East Upstairs this Saturday the 27th.

--Mike Gutierrez

   

Interview with Christoph Krey of McAlister Drive

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Christoph Krey is the mastermind behind the Boston indie-rock sensation McAlister Drive. Recently they rocked SXSW and are preparing to release a new EP on April 1st. On Thursday they are saying good-bye to three members of the band with a farewell show at the Lizard Lounge on Thursday the 25th. Tickets are only 5 dollars. '

Deli: You’ve worked a lot with Mark Kaye of Hear Now Live, what do you think about what he has been doing [for the Boston music scene]?

Christoph Krey: He’s a really good guy. He’s really got a unique, strong vision with Hear Now Live. I think what he is trying to do is bring the best bands he can find, bring them to a smaller venue and make them discovered through his resources. He’s also the type of person who knows a lot of people and you wouldn’t think so. So he [has the means] to support a band on any level. He’s seen us and helped us on many levels.

Read the full interview HERE

--Interview by Meghan Chiampa