best-emerging-bands-artists

Vow of Volition Make the Final Round of the Battle for Warped Tour

The Vans Warped Tour was the first festival for many of us back in the day. As young'ns, it's likely we didn't necessarily think about all that went into figuring out the bands to book and play the whole shebang. Part of that process, at least locally, seems to be through a series "battle of the bands" style competitions specifically for landing a spot on the fest. Quite a few Portland bands have been furiously playing against one another for said spot, and djent/prog metal act Vow of Volition are one of the acts that made it to the finals.

Warped Tour was always the type of festival that included much in the realm of pop punk, punk punk, emo and metal, so Vow of Volition's advancement to the final round is no surprise. Their incredibly technical, at times jazzy metal stands out in Portland's pretty linear popular music scene, and is much worthy of the attention its getting.

Those that want to support Vow of Volition in driving home the permanent spot can go to the Battle for Warped Tour finals Saturday at the Hawthorne Theatre.

   

Anyone Anyway's "If I Could Unlearn You" is a rare emo treat for gloomy minds

We miss emo, plain and simple, take it to the bank and rage (or cry) with us. Groups like Anyone Anyway are keeping the genre that burgeoned in the Midwest during the second half of the ‘90s alive. The band from Providence is adept at infusing angst and sensitivity into its cyclone of dazzling drum fills, fuzzy basslines and electrifying guitar riffs that jolt the body into chaotic movement. The vocal acrobatics from lead singer Nick McCarty complete the cathartic experience the band promotes by delivering the intensity the genre demands. The group’s latest single “If I Could Unlearn You” showcases the band’s passion and makes good on a commitment to surrender to the sound. The accompanying music video is as tragic as the song itself, and that is just perfect. Bask in the gloom of “If I Could Unlearn You” below. - Rene Cobar

   

New Music Video: "Anna" - The Menzingers

The Menzingers recently shared a new video for “Anna,” the lead single from their forthcoming Will Yip-produced album Hello Exile. The imagery candidly chronicles one’s movements throughout the days and nights in the city. It's a video-diary of longing, which demonstrates the void created by missing an integral part of your life. The band is slated to perform at Franklin Music Hall on Friday, November 29, as part of a lineup that also includes Tigers Jaw and Culture Abuse. The band also announced that Hello Exile is due to drop on October 4 via Epitaph.

   

Pet Fox previews new record with electric single "Swerving," plays ONCE 07.24

They say the best things come in small packages, that could not be more true for Pet Fox’s new single “Swerving.” The Boston-based trio packs a lot of surprises into the one minute and twenty-three-second song: a somewhat disjointed compilation of acoustic and electric guitar strains are held together by a solid drum rhythm as they rage beside warm vocal harmonies. The summery vibe of the single comes from the group’s tendency to permeate its indie rock with ‘60s pop overtones, but the edge comes from its math-rock understanding. “Swerving” is a preview of the group’s upcoming record Rare Occasion out everywhere July 19th. The band will be playing ONCE in Somerville on July 24th, and we are streaming “Swerving” to keep its sizzle going. - Rene Cobar

   

Aan's Grief is Palpable on Losing My Shadow

Aan released their latest album, Losing My Shadow, last month via Fresh Selects. Losing Shadow is frontman Bud Wilson's way of recreating the mental and emotional spaces created by grief, and what purposes these new spaces can serve. The album has clean percussive hits, accented by syncopations that throw the song off just enough to make you really appreciate the way the music shapes itself. The album's first single, "Truly Massive" is the sort of mournful, space-cowboy ballad that could only be made by a psych band. It's hard to explain the feelings that the song evokes, a shadowy combination of pain, longing, and the hope for a reunion. Wilson's voice carries all of these emotions and more. It is touching and sentimental but retains the sort of wistful aloofness that leaves you feeling like something important is just barely out of your reach. The album is an incredibly impressive emotional project, one for which Wilson should be commended. 

-By Avril Carrillo