austin

Rags and Riches: Teeta's Wild Ride

 The Teeta and Netherfriends keep Austin’s arms pumping and heads banging with the rhyming rhythmical musical miracle, The Stimulus. The duo use bassy drums, rhyme and The Teeta’s deep flowy voice to develop an entire album which centers around money and the daily hustle. This LP is sure to make you amped up and relaxed at the same time with smooth vocals and vibrants beats.


Chill, yet powerful in beat and lyrics, The Stimulus has its own niche and takes you on a wild drum ride. The hi-hats serve to add some funk and light to the album, while the rhyme creates a flow. Coupled with this, the bassy reverb and kicks compliment Teeta’s deep voice and create a chill atmosphere.

The Stimulus serves as a prime new example of The Teeta’s work and really embodies the financial part of his life. With a consistent flow throughout the LP, we really begin to see how each individual element The Teeta talked about shaped his life. From the LP, it is evident there were highs and lows which all together shaped The Teeta.

With an album like this, The Teeta is sure to come out with many more solid hits in the future, and this album shows an entirely new playstyle for The Teeta. All-in-all, The Stimulus is a bassy hit which contrasts The Teetas floatier albums, like The Quarantine. As a listener, I am going to keep my eye on The Teeta while he goes global, because he sure will. 

- Eric Haney

   

Abhi The Nomad Drops New Single “Stay”

 

The thesis behind Abhi The Nomad's new single "Stay" is right there in the intro: this is a program about flow. 

 

Over the course of "Stay," his first release 2020 and featuring , the indie Austin rapper delivers a slick and crisp flow over an unwaveringly digestible beat; from Nintendo 64 references to relationship foundations, Abhi and austin hip-hop artist love-sadKID cover ground over the course of a two-and-a-half minute single. 

 

With the latest release, Abhi The Nomad distances himself a bit from the indie pop-adjacent ear worm stratosphere he inhabited on 2019's Modern Trash and centers more towards the dressings of 70s soul with a 90s flow a lá 2015's Where Are My Friends. 

 

Abhi The Nomad's greatest work often puts his off-center hip-hop feel and sound at the forefront ("Soul Safety Administration" comes to mind). With "Stay," Abhi appears to be fully aware of this too, as he leans into being an indie hip-hop mainstay, rather than reaching for something lighter and more accommodating to commercial success. 

 

-Ben Wiese 

 

 

   

Entering The Atmosphere: New Margaret Chavez Record Dreams Big

 

Into An Atmosphere, Marcus William Striplin's excellent sophomore LP under his folky Americana project Margaret Chavez, is a haunting, soothing, fully-enveloping record. 

 

Across eight tracks, Striplin pulls few punches. From taking listeners through familial trauma at an ICE detention center in "The Croupiers Unite I.C.E. ("To be a cat licking your paws in front of an ice detention bus") to the power-driven wrestling match in "I Virgo" ("Forever keeper of the past//you use your powers to advance and cripple") the record achieves the evergreen without watering down the present. 

 

Just when the terms of engagement appear to be dictated, Striplin kicks up the dust and unleashes swelling synths and psychedelic guitar textures, making for a markedly different soundscape. ("H O R A" shines bright.) Though occasionally feeling almost sparse or trim, the record has adequate space between the sobering emotional stakes evoked throughout. 

 

For all of its elegance, quiet, and restraint, Into An Atmosphere is also a decisive, dynamic, and effective shout.

 


- Ben Wiese

 

   

Jonathan Terrell Releases New Single “Never Makes a Sound”

 

Austin’s Cosmic Cowboy is saddling up for another long haul; as Jonathan Terrell gears up to release his third record, Westward, he’s dropped one last morsel for us to devour while waiting in the wings. “Never Makes a Sound” is the latest single from Westwardand it’s a rip-roaring good time about losing yourself in the search to discover more.

Terrell described the new record as “the stories of all of us” while he’s the vessel, funneling all this celestial energy directly to our ears. Among the many muses guiding him on this journey are Nick Cave, Tom Petty and Bob Seger, each distinctly part of the sonic landscape of Westward and “Never Makes a Sound”, if not without the help of a little Bruce Springsteen.

“Never Makes a Sound” capitalizes on the strength of Terrell’s anthemic storytelling talents and weaves in diligent notes taken from hours spent listening to the masters, even working with some. Gregg Rolie (Santana, Journey), Shakey Graves and the Band of Heathens contributed as bandmembers during recording, and “Never Makes a Sound” has the defiant attitude of a confidently-composed classic, something that’s been unearthed as a previously unreleased Born To RunB-side.

Terrell’s aim to be the vessel delivering “the stories of all of us” pushes him to craft premium singalong material in the stadium rock tradition. He channels inspiration from his most recent European tour where he discovered a bigger global fantasy of exploring “The West” than what exists in American folklore. In “Never Makes a Sound”, the theme is explored with tales of searching for freedom “where the desert meets the sea” and dancing with the ghosts of elders through the blinding rain.

“Never Makes a Sound” is a whopper that fits right into Terrell’s catalog while standing out as some of his most extroverted work yet. It hurts a little to imagine what this song might look like played at Red Rocks or another storied outdoor venue; Terrell is far from immune to the state of the world and is releasing his record with a livestream listening party instead of a concert. In the closing refrain, though, he paints an appropriately passionate picture of his own Wild West: “Dry lightning keeps on flashing, but it never makes a sound.”

- Mike Floeck 

   

Heartless Bastards Release New Single "Revolution"

 

As an American people, we’re reckoning with what the likes of a modern-day revolution will look like. There’s no telling if, when or where - but the Heartless Bastards would like to take this moment to remind you that you control it in your mind. Back with their first release in over five years since breaking through to the Billboard 200 with Arrow, the band has an answer for the moment with their new single “Revolution”.

Clocking at over six minutes, “Revolution” paints a broad stroke of melodic brilliance as it ponders what brought us all to the brink. Name-checking Big Brother is part of bandleader Erika Wennerstrom’s Bowery-via-Americana method of marrying the merits of class-checking punk rock to class-obliterating folk. She catalogs being watched and solicited by the other while fuming about the disparity between the haves and have-nots - it works out like Melissa Etheridge covering a Patti Smith deep cut.

In choosing to return with a call for revolution, the Heartless Bastards don’t abandon any of the cred they’ve built over the last two decades. Instead, they retrain their focus and aim a little higher. Sonically, the tune starts out as typical fodder for musical call-to-arms: languid, easy and slightly psychedelic in the same vein of later Lennon compositions. Then, all hell begins to break loose.

As the lyrics get angrier, the music builds to match. Tension vents like steam as the song gets louder and louder. Lyrics transform to stream-of-conscious blurts, like a folkloric take on the Ramones’ “Ignorance Is Bliss”. The lyrical cadence suits the subject matter and the song extremely well, as rambling about commercialized life, happiness pills and gilded political lies is less a dissociating experience than it is a heartening wake-up call in this context.

After laying down the state of the world as she sees it, Wennerstrom frames her thesis in six words: “The revolution is in your mind.” That is to say, we all control it as much as we control our thoughts and actions. We are the generators of our own compassion and empathy, and we pass our energy along to the next generation after we go. You can hear the longing in the extra millisecond Wennerstrom pauses when she sings, “Do you...remember?” It’s a desire in her for this song to start something new, to gin up some trouble, and to replace fear with hope. And it’s the idea that we’re more than capable of doing so.

- Mike Floeck