Soul

Sho releases soaring debut single "Planet Hurt"

Sho Ishikura makes their recorded debut with the single "Planet Hurt", an R&B ballad in the vein of artists like Prince, with Ishikura's soulful voice harmonizing over a seductive beat delivering lyrics such as "She gets me wet like a newborn." When Ishikura shared the song with fellow songwriters at an ASCAP workshop a couple of years ago, industry folks and other artists showed hesitation at the subject matter. However, a substantial amount of people were intrigued by Ishikura's tune, creating a sense of controversy that helped create some buzz for it. The uproar of "Planet Hurt" -- a track which blends pleasure with pain, light with dark --  makes it a piece of work worth your ears' attention, so that you can form your own opinion about it. Take a listen to "Planet Hurt" below. - Will Sisskind

   

Kleptokrat release new EP, play Rose Gold on 7/9

Combining elements of pop, jazz, soul and heavy rock into an appealing progressive mix, Brooklyn's Kleptokrat is a band intent in expanding the parameters of alternative rock. Their newly released sophomore EP “Momentarily, to Grace” boasts five impeccably recorded, genre-twisting tracks. Soulful horns and sweet, jazzy female lead vocals establish the mood on opening song “The Great Leap Forward.” Over the track's four minutes, precise, angular structures give way to floating ambient interludes that merge together with beguiling charm. “Jumping Ship” applies those light and airy vocals to a lyrically dense story of relationships coming undone, punctuated by heavy bass, sax and drums. “Kleptocito” further adds touches of latin rhythms to what becomes an over five minute instrumental tour-de-force. Final cuts “The View at Bethlehem” and “Body in the Room” bring back those engaging, honeyed vocals over alternately dreamy-to-frenzied compositions. The band kicks off their summer tour at Rose Gold on 7/9, followed by a stop in Philly on 7/11. Full tour dates can be found here. - Dave Cromwell

   

Acoustic neo-soul

Time: 
18:30
Band name: 
Faith NYC
FULL Artist Facebook address (http://...): 
https://www.facebook.com/faithny1/
Venue name: 
Mercury Lounge
   

Cindy Latin mixes elegance and urban flair in new single "In a Year From Now"

Matching the splendor of the tasteful instrumentation that accompanies her, Boston’s Cindy Latin lets her vocals soar in her latest single “In a Year From Now.” Yes, the drums flash some nearly-acrobatic fills, the bass grooves deliciously, and the trumpets are resonant, but it is Cindy’s passionate expressions that captivate, switching with ease from flowing verses to soulful choruses, she commits to them wholly. Cindy Latin strikes that perfect balance between an elegant soul singer and hardened street lady, similarly as another gal people may know of named Alicia Keys. “In a Year From Now” drips with honest curiosity about the future, and easily creates a narrative that we can all relate to, Cindy Latin channels the message well. Without further ado “In a Year From Now” is streaming below for your listening pleasure. - Rene Cobar 

   

Jamila Woods Brings Soulful Healing to Barracuda

 A sold out show: Jamila Woods and her amazing band brought authentic Chicago strength and soul to Barracuda playing her new album LEGACY! LEGACY! The instruments were dressed with bright colored scarves and a black obelisk donning Wood’s lyrics stood tall behind them on stage. 

Sipping warm tea between songs, Woods radiated humility and gratitude. With impeccable composure and insight, she introduced her songs sharing the inspiration and process behind them.

 

Woods dropped some facts about Frida Kahlo’s life and allowed her lyrics to explain the rest in FRIDA, a songstory about a difficult relationship seeking harmony through boundaries; “I like you better when you see me less...We could do it like Frida, we could build a bridge then I could come see ya.” Her thought-provoking lyrics and her melodic vocals cajole the listener to feel between the lines and awe at her command of figurative language.

 

Her positively-charged-proton presence fills the room. Her poetry amplifies the positivity as her lyrics serve to empower herself and the audience. Do not misunderstand this positivism to mean blind idealism or marxism, the positivity instead represents renewed optimism born from adversity. Her song, EARTHA, addresses the battle some may wage with self worth and self love. Before singing this one she asked us, “Has anyone ever been in a relationship that fucked you up?” Imagine how many people confirmed her question with hoots and hollers.

 

This song, EARTHA, became one of the anthems of the evening as Woods paused, demonstrating how to cast a self-love spell and inviting the audience to participate by joining her  to sing the chorus: “Who gonna share my love for me with me?” Everyone’s relationship with Self is unique to their own, but if you were waiting for permission to love yourSelf, here it is from Jamila Woods. Repeat this chorus as many times as necessary. Follow up with HOLY from her HEAVN album. The audience needed no invitation to sing along to this one, the penultimate song of the evening. The hypnotic hymn provides another powerful mantra and declaration: “Woke up this morning with my mind set on loving me.”

The album’s content and scope reaches deeper and farther than just positivity, but it is by this means that she delivers an end (not the end). OCTAVIA is a song of poetic justice and so, so meta. Woods sings, “it used to be a crime to write a line, our great great greats risked their lives to learn by fireside,” as a reverential nod to her ancestral past. She continues, “We are a precious creation, our black has no imitation.” Her lines can resonate with anyone of any background, but her love for her blood is healing and beautiful.

 

Woods’ words are incredible, but her articulation and delivery is what gives them life. ZORA, named after the author Zora Neale Hurston, catches the ear with how she dissects and “discomobs [our] mold” of understanding. With a touch of zen buddhism, the chorus repeats “you will never know everything, everything. I will never know everything, everything;” and with a sprinkle of peaceful protest the second verse is an embedded poem within the song: “My weaponry/ is my energy/ I tenderly/ fill my enemies/ with white light.”

 

Woods brought more than just good energy to the show on Tuesday night, she brought lasting ruminations, free affirmations, and peaceful incantations. The Chicago spirit of the band blessed this Austin crowd.

 

 

 

-Melissa Green