Milktooth

What To Do Tonight?!?! 10.22

Sometimes, it seems like EVERYTHING happens in ONE night. My Facebook is blowing up, show flyers are all over the place and with only a few hours to go, my decision-making anxiety is at an all-time high. It's very possible that I'm not the only one, so here's a basic breakdown of all the awesomeness that will be happening all over our fair city tonight:

The JAG Album Release Party
"Pondermental Wonderment In Hypocricity"
Palaver Thursday at FooBAR
9:00 pm
$5
w/ Bantam Foxes, The Mumzees and Uzi

The best of underground East Nashville are coming out to play. Prepare to get weird.

 

 

 

Tesla Rossa EP Release Show
"Heat Bath"
The Basement East
8:30 pm
$10
w/ The Beech Benders, Milktooth, Becca Mancari and Luella

The most eclectic bill of the night, with everything from indie to beach to folk rock. And you can ONLY get the EP at this show or one of their gigs on tour, so grab 'em while they last.

 

 

 

Miller Made Music Presents: The Gills
Exit/In
8:00 pm
$5
w/ Lauren Strange and Behold the Brave

Fancy yourself a heat-seeker? This lineup miiiight burn your eyebrows off.


 

 

Give the bands a listen, and choose wisely...                   -Caroline Bowman

 

   

The Deli Nashville and Apple Road Present... Take Over the Press: Local Shows

Last night at our show featuring Milktooth, The Gills, and Vinyl Thief, Apple Road and The Deli Nashville teamed up to give you the chance to tell us your thoughts about the Nashville music scene and take over the blog for a day! With the ballots tallied, we give you... The Deli Nashville and Apple Road Present... Take Over the Press!

In our third category, we gave you the mic to hype your most-anticipated upcoming local show. East Nashville Underground seems to be on everyone's mind this week (can you blame them?), but there are some exciting shows coming up, and you guys told us what to keep an eye on:

Milktooth (next up: May 25th @ The Basement)
East Side Hootenanny (every Thursday in May @ East Park)
East Nashville Underground (May 10th & 11th @ the East Room)
The JAG (May 18th @ East Side Hootenanny)
Black Sea Royalty (tba)
The Saint Johns (June 1st @ the Basement)
The next Deli showcase (aw... thanks, guys!)
Johnny Velvet and the Scares (May 9th @ the End)
Dick Dale & *repeat repeat (April 30th @ Mercy Lounge)
Road To Bonnaroo stage (June 13-16 @ Bonnaroo)

   

The Deli Nashville and Apple Road Present... Take Over the Press: Favorite Artists

 

Last night at our show featuring Milktooth, The Gills, and Vinyl Thief, Apple Road and The Deli Nashville teamed up to give you the chance to tell us your thoughts about the Nashville music scene and take over the blog for a day! With the ballots tallied, we give you... The Deli Nashville and Apple Road Present... Take Over the Press!

In our category for "Favorite Local Artist," we had an overwhelming number of fans vote for Vinyl Thief, The Gills, and Milktooth, which is both expected and deserved. (Shout out to The JAG, who also had an solid turnout!) But the full list is impressive and spot-on, so check out which favorites are hitting radars throughout the local music scene:

The Gills
Milktooth
Vinyl Thief
The Future
Colorfeels
Thunderbitch
The JAG
Nudity
Billy Swayze
Vanessa Barbee
Kaby
Daniel Ellsworth & the Great Lakes
The Features
Peter Terry & the City Profits
Justin Kalk Orchestra
Natural Blonde
Johnny Velvet & the Scares
Cherub
*repeat repeat
Kink Ador
The Young International

   

The Deli Nashville and Apple Road Present... Take Over the Press: Favorite Songs

Last night at our show featuring Milktooth, The Gills, and Vinyl Thief, Apple Road and The Deli Nashville teamed up to give you the chance to tell us your thoughts about the Nashville music scene and take over the blog for a day! With the ballots tallied, we give you... The Deli Nashville and Apple Road Present... Take Over the Press!

In the first category, we present to you your choices for the "Favorite Song By Local Artist" category, complete with a Spotify playlist* of your choices.

Spotify playlist: The Deli Nashville & Apple Road: Take Over the Press
The Young International, "Vampire"
*repeat repeat, "12345678" [stream here]
Natural Blonde, "30th Street"
Justin Kalk Orchestra, "Pancakes & Syrup" [stream here]
The Gills, "Let's Get Together"
The JAG, "White Horse"
The Features, "Golden Comb"
Peter Terry & the City Profits, "Stripper Song"
Milktooth, "In My Blood"
The JAG, "Talk At Me"
Mikky Ekko, "Pull Me Down"
Daniel Ellsworth & the Great Lakes, "Shoe Fits"
The Gills, "Summer Lovin'"
Milktooth, "The Gate"
Milktooth, "O Laredo!"
The Joy Of Painting, "Dontchu Wanna" [out May 21st on Tender Age EP. Stream here.]
Sexx, "Top Down" [stream here]
The Gills, "Keep Holding On"
COIN, "It's Okay"
Milktooth, "Billie Jean"
Cherub, "Roxxy"

*Songs not available on Spotify are featured in the links provided.

   

Stay Home America: An Interview With Milktooth's David Condos

Milktooth have been on fire this week. In addition to gearing up to debut a new song at our show at the Stone Fox tonight, the band released the latest (and possibly best) episode of their Stay Home America series. Just when it seems there's no topping the last episode (in this case, their gorgeous interpretation of Beck's "Eyes That say I Love You"), they go and do it again. Episode six finds the band covering Mumford and Sons' "Whispers In the Dark" in a refurbished mechanic shop in Germantown and, in keeping with the theme of the series, this latest cover may be their best one yet.

Born from bassist Zac Stred's idea to start a video series to complement the band's Tour America series, Milktooth began work on the first episode of Stay Home America last summer as a way to generate new content between their own releases. With only six episodes under their belt, each cover is a fantastic and re-worked rendition of a song by a known artist. The latest clip may be Milktooth's most abstract yet, so we decided to get to the bottom of things.

The Deli Nashville: What moves you to choose the songs that you choose?
David Condos: We choose songs based on a number of factors. First, we need to like the bones of the song. Once we have the song stripped down to its basic elements, we can change the instrumentation and arrangement however we like. Sowe are always thinking about what might make an interesting subject for our little experiment. But ultimately, I need to like the original lyrics and melodies enough to sing them because those are the least changeable parts of the equation.

DN: What are the pictures of in the video for "Whispers In the Dark"?
DC: For this song, we wanted the visuals to play off the emotion invoked by the closing lyric, "While we are young." The song struck us as a retrospective story of nostalgia or regret. So we gathered a collection of photos from the 1940s and 1950s that showed a variety of nostalgic memories from people's long lost youths (vacations, dances, family celebrations, classrooms, etc). We were really excited about how it all ended up working together, especially since this was the third different visual idea that we explored for pairing with this song. We originally wanted to shoot it at a taxidermy shop or an antique mall but couldn't find a location that would allow our shoot. Third idea was the charm.

DN: Where was this episode filmed?
DC: Another aspect of this series that we've tried to change with each episode is the location. Shooting both video and audio on location can present a number of challenges, but it's fun to explore different possibilities and let each location shape the video to a certain extent. For this video, we wanted an open area that would give the projections enough space to have their impact. So we recorded it at a refurbished mechanic shop in Germantown, which is where the church I'm a part of meets.

DN: Who directs these videos?
DC: We started out directing the first few episodes ourselves; this meant that we would set up a handful of stationary cameras around us, press record and start playing the song. Then I would edit the footage together. Fortunately, we've had some talented help with the past two videos. For Beck's "Eyes that Say I Love You," direction and editing was provided by Jace Freeman of the Moving Picture Boys, who just premiered their new documentary "Nashville 2012" at the Nashville Film Festival. Jace not only improved the look of the video but he also brought a storyline, which worked perfectly with the song's lyrics. This episode was shot and edited by our friend Caleb McLaughlin. The projector element complicated the shoot more than I anticipated, so I'm not sure how we would have done it without him. Strangely enough, our Beck video was shot at Caleb's home, so this isn't the first time he's been a champion of Stay Home America.

DN: How do you get your brain around your arrangements of each song?
DC: Breaking down a song and writing a new arrangement is one of our favorite things about what we do. We've loved doing this to our own songs for special occasions too, so it seemed like a natural transition when we had the idea to start this video series. For Kavinsky's "Nightcall" we wrote the arrangement together in our practice space, just like we would when writing a new song. I had the idea for this Mumford cover late last year so I pieced together a demo a while back, and then we got together to finesse the details earlier this month.

For the Stay Home America arrangements, we try take each song in a different direction than the original artist did. We loved stripping down The xx's "Fiction" and turning it into a unplugged song for Zac's back porch. So I thought it would be cool to do the opposite thing to a Mumford song, taking their old-time thumper and giving it a minimalist groove based on a string synth. I've become a bit of a synth geek, so I was especially excited to get to use a new piece that I bought earlier this year.

Examining "Whispers in the Dark" taught me that the song was much more interesting than I believed on first listen. I think that the original arrangement has so many uptempo instrumental elements going on that it distracts from how dark and beautiful the lyrics are. By slowing down the tempo and exposing the vocals, I think it allows the focus to shift to the song's story, which describes loss and regret before landing on the final stanza's "Carpe Diem" proclamation. So this arrangement was influenced both by our understanding of the original lyrics and by our desire to take the song into new musical territory. Hopefully, our take can be appreciated by Mumford fans and non-Mumford fans alike. –Brianne Turner